BRITISH INDIA AND THIRD GENERATION IMPERIALISM

BRITISH INDIA AND THIRD GENERATION IMPERIALISM

Author: roderick matthews Write To Author

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BRITISH INDIA AND THIRD GENERATION IMPERIALISM - eBook by Roderick Matthews
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BRITISH INDIA AND THIRD GENERATION IMPERIALISM

 

eBook by

Roderick Matthews

 

EBOOK FOR DOWNLOAD TO PRINTER
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EBOOK Size: 148 KB; 40 pages;

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© Roderick Matthews 2008

 

Before they took on government in India, the British had for some time been ruling subject peoples overseas, in Ireland and in the thirteen North American colonies. After the acquisition of Bengal, however, it soon became obvious that very little of what had been learned from these previous overseas ventures was of relevance in India, where the people and the laws seemed so alien that familiar constitutional principles could not be applied. New solutions to the problems that arose, both conceptual and practical, would therefore have to be found. The Anglo-Indian relationship that eventually emerged was of a new type, which stood apart from the empires of the ancient world, or from those of Spain and Portugal. It was based on a new approach to the political and economic domination of lands at a distance, forming a new imperialism that went beyond the previous strategies of invasion (1G) or absorption (2G). It was a third version of an imperial relationship.

The 3G imperialism built by the British in India after 1757 sprang from a capitalist country, unlike all previous imperial models, and was curiously antithetical to the political system that devised it. A Britain obsessed with legalities, representation and consent produced a system that contained none of these. This system was well adapted to the India out of which it grew, but in the years after 1858 it became rigid and unresponsive and it ceased to develop. No attempt was made to replace it with the next wave of British imperial thinking, so that while colonies like Canada and New Zealand moved on, India remained fundamentally set in her place in the imperial scheme. Before 1914, with India still secure within the Empire, there was neither need, willingness nor method to change the fundamental relationship defined over the first hundred years of British rule. The rush to adapt the system after the First World War was too little and too late. The one thing that had always been missing - consent - was never willingly or fully given, when at last it was sought through political, as opposed to social, institutions.

This eBook is an examination of that Third Generation imperialism, its roots and its content.

 

Roderick Matthews, Historian, (author of Flaws in the Jewel) obtained a First from Balliol College, Oxford in Modern History. Studied Medieval History under Maurice Keen. Studied Tudor and Stuart History under Christopher Hill, Master of Balliol College. Studied European History under Colin Lucas, later Master of Balliol College and Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University. Studied Imperial History under Professor Paul Longford, Rector of Lincoln College.

 

 

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