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SEARCHING FOR THE SAHAJ

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SEARCHING FOR THE SAHAJ
In Pursuit of Abiding Happiness: An Indo-Greek Dialogue

 

eBook by

Bharat Gupt

 

US$ 1 Only

 

eBook Only Available on IdeaIndia.Com

eBook for Download
eBook Size: 141 KB; 16 pages;

 

© Bharat Gupt 2008

 

An Indo-Greek dialogue on happiness. An Indian philosopher residing in Persia accompanied some ayurvedic doctors in the Persian armies of Darius invading Greece in 492 BC. But before the battle of Marathon, he disappeared into the country side.

A decade later, he came to settle in Athens, disputing and debating in the agora and came to be popularly known as “Pharatos.” After his death, he entered the Elysian Fields; from where like other philosophers and learned souls in Hades, he continues to look at the global human affairs from his times to the present, as an unexamined life is not worth living even after death.

This eBook gives a dialogue of Pharatos, “Searching for the Sahaj, In Pursuit of Abiding Happiness”

 

Bharat Gupt Associate Professor, CVS, Delhi University. Founder member and Trustee International Forum for India's Heritage. Born in 1946 in Moradabad, a small town in the Uttar Pradesh province of India of mixed Hindu-Muslim population, best known for its engraved art on brassware and a little less for Hindustani music and Urdu poetry. Parents moved in early fifties to Delhi, the new capital of modernity and political intrigue, where I went to school and college and studied English, Hindi, Sanskrit and philosophy, but spent every summer in the district town. Spent a year in the US at the end of Counter-Cultural days and took a Master's degree from Toronto.

I learnt to play the sitar and surbahar under the eminent musician Uma Shankar Mishra and studied musicology , yoga sutras and classics under Acarya Brihaspati and Swami Kripalvananda. Trained both in modern European and traditional Indian educational systems, I have worked in classical studies, theatre, music, culture and media studies and researched as Senior Onassis Fellow in Greece on revival of ancient Greek theatre.

As a classicist I came to realise that ancient Greek drama and culture as a whole, was given an unduly empirical color by the modern West. Looking at things from my own location I saw that Greek theatre was closer to ancient Indian theatre as an ethical and religious act or hieropraxis. Instead of being seen as Western and Eastern, Greek and Indian theatres should be seen rooted in the Indo-European cultural beliefs, myths and idolatory and the aesthetics of emotional arousal. I have lectured on theatre and music at various Universities in India, North America and Greece. I am on visiting faculty at the National School of Drama, Delhi and the Bhartendu Academy for Dramatic Arts , Lucknow.